Friday, March 15, 2013

HARRIS HAS FINALLY RETURNED TO NEW YORK

     Wayson Harris has  returned to New York City.  He is visiting with the lovely and talented Anne of Ace and looks just about set to make an appearance in a bookstore near you this October.
     The Clone Assassin started off as an easy write, got very difficult toward the middle and ended on a good note.  At one point it was one and a half times longer than previous Wayson Harris adventures, but now it's slimmed down... though its still a good 4,000 words longer than any Clone books before it.
     What else can I tell you?
     The first Titan Publishing edition comes out next Friday.  Here is a link.  Titan

     In anticipation of the Titan release, SFFWorld has reviewed The Clone Republic, and Lordy what a review they gave me.  Thank you, Mark Yon!  (Here is the link)  You better believe I sent this link to family, friends, and any strangers whose email I happen to know.
     I gotta tell you, this book has really given me fits.  After I finished the first draft, with the deadline just a week away, I totally creamed my shoulder.  It hurt the first night, hurt worse the next, three days in I had to lift my right arm and place it on my keyboard to type, and then I fell asleep with an ice pack on my shoulder and the damn thing stopped working entirely.
     After prayers, Percosets, and two-thirds of a bottle of Ibuprofen, my shoulder is pretty okay, but that little mishap didn't help me with my deadline.
     Anyway, the book is in.  I hope Anne likes it.  In October I hope you all like it, too.

61 comments:

naens said...

this is awesome! more publicity too! i see movies in ten years. :P

naens said...

will there be anything different besides the cover? i think the cover is really cool, but i still like what mcgrath has done.

JenMo said...

Right on! That's an interesting and insightful review. I like the point that "marines are marines." I'm a little surprised the reviewer didn't allude to what sets Harris apart, but I guess that's a spoiler in book 1.

Steven L. Kent said...

The Titan editions do have extras. Books 1 and 2 feature interviews in which I list my favorite video games. Book 3 has a story about the first time I heard a BBC Hitchhiker's Guide broadcast. Book 4 will have a list of the top ten science fiction places I have visited in real life. Book 5 and 6 include short stories that I wrote to help develop technologies for Harris novels. Books 7-9 will have original short stories that take place in the Wayson Harris universe.

Steven L. Kent said...

What can I say? I'm just grateful for such a favorable review.

JenMo said...

Will any of the extras, like the short stories, be released in the US? Maybe as online only deals offered for ereaders?

Steven L. Kent said...

I don't see it as being in the cards, though I would LOVE to create additional materials for the Ace editions. Ace has been very, very good to me and I want to do all that I can to support them.

naens said...

any chance of a collection of the short stories? this is awesome for the Harris series. :D

Steven L. Kent said...

Stephen King said that the reason he wrote the book Everything is Eventual was to help bring back the short story. That book got 336 reviews on Amazon.com. That same year he wrote a rather disappointing novel called From A Buick 8 which garnered 386 reviews. Remember, From a Buick 8 was sort of a stinker.

In 2001, he wrote another stinker called Dreamcatcher that got 729 reviews. He spent the next few years publishing revisions and experimenting in other genres, then returned to horror in 2006 with a mildly disappointing The Stand-like book called, Cell, which got 1108 reviews.

For the record, I am looking at a Stephen King bibliography. I have not read all of his books and do not have them all memorized.

Neil Gaiman, another phenomenal writer, has had the same experience. When he releases a The Graveyard Book or an American Gods--an R-rated book that I do NOT recommend for young readers, it flies off the shelf. When he dabbles in short stories, and he has an AMAZING talent for short stories--though I do NOT recommend all of his short stories for young readers, either... for the same reason--he does not sell nearly as many volumes.

For this reason, that people just shop for short story collections the way they shop for novels, publishers stay away from them.

Joshua Tamasovich said...

American Gods, Neverwhere and Sandman are the three works I have read by Neil Gaiman.

I have seen collections of sci-fi short stories but never took that plunge. I had a book called Red Shift that I tried to start maybe 10 times but never got more then a few pages before it went back on the self.

I have read one short story anthology recently while I was on a zombie kick, The Undead (Zombie Anthology) by D.L. Snell, David Wellington, David Moody, Derek Gunn, Eric S. Brown; pretty entertaining.

I am guessing but with the e-reader market, an author could put out a short story and get a pretty big audience. I have bought a couple of short stories but prefer something with a bit more substance.

JenMo said...

I've noticed several authors who release individual short stories and novellas as self-published works on amazon, B&N, iTunes, etc. Usually as extras for already well selling series. I suppose it would all depend on contractual obligations, but I've kind of always had hopes for Freeman: the Early Years in that vein.

Joshua Tamasovich said...

That is a pretty impressive book review by Mr. Yon and I think the "Think The Hurt Locker but in an SF setting." nailed it.

Steven L. Kent said...

That was an interesting allusion, and particularly fitting with the early Gobi scenes.

Joshua Tamasovich said...

A couple of books into the series, you see Harris as an experienced soldier that has served with various squads, teams and leaders; usually being the most experienced member in the team. Harris keeps cool in combat unless his reflex gets the best of him and knows his enemy; either being the UA or the Avatari.

Steven L. Kent said...

That was absolutely the goal. I wanted him to evolve from book to book.

naens said...

it was also interesting that after the first book and before betrayal, Harris always had a sense that the U.A was his true enemy.

Steven L. Kent said...

Even in the first book. I mean, he starts out completely gung-ho, but he loses that enthusiasm after meeting Che Huang and visiting congress. he's kind of jaded in the introduction to the first book.

naens said...

well he was a brainwashed clone... even if he didn't know that yet.

Joshua Tamasovich said...

It started at the poker game!

Steven L. Kent said...

The intro was him on Ravenwood... first words, "You picked a hell of a place to die, Marine."

naens said...

you managed to pull off starting with the end and tying it all together. :D done correctly, which you did, that can be quite awesome.

Steven L. Kent said...

It worked out that time.

naens said...

that it did. it was particularly nice as a series opener.

Steven L. Kent said...

Thanks, Naens.

Mike Fisher said...

The next Wayson book (The Clone Assassin) has been preordered! Sorry I have to wait until October. Heh.

Love your work, Steven!

Steven L. Kent said...

Thanks, Mike. I think you should like this one a lot.

naens said...

oh crap, i just read the description of book 9 and it is awesome! though i think mentioning cutter might have been a tad of a spoiler.:P i like the new direction your going in with third person views of the characters around harris and it seems like that is continuing.

Steven L. Kent said...

He buys the farm pretty early.

JenMo said...

I saw an author tweet yesterday that he wants to earn his RR's. that it will become a title authors aspire to. I think with your ruthless ability to kill characters you're pretty close to being Steven RR Kent.

Steven L. Kent said...

RRs as in George R R Martin or J R R Tolkien?

Thanks.

JenMo said...

I only thought of Martin but Tolkien might be applicable as well.

naens said...

cutter was one of the characters i liked in the series. :P but thats part of what makes the series human i guess. all the best characters except for harris eventually die.

Steven L. Kent said...

C'mon guys! I've been really well behaved of late. I barely killed anybody important in Sedition.

JenMo said...

You're right you're right. You didn't even kill those who deserved it the most.

Steven L. Kent said...

Oh, well, those were my first true villains and good villains are hard to come by.

Aaron Spuler said...

David Drake is known for killing off characters.

As is Dan Abnett in his Gaunt's Ghost's series.

Steven L. Kent said...

Because of his professional notoriety, George R R Martin is indeed the author most associated with the willingness to kill of major characters, but he's not the first or the only. That said, a number of you have mentioned becoming tired of becoming invested in characters who die.

Aaron Spuler said...

I think that if you're invested in a character and shocked/saddened when they die -- then you, as an author, have done your job properly. Wear that as a badge of honor Steven.

Steven L. Kent said...

Thanks, Aaron... and Remember, the that smart-alec Spuler character still lives!

naens said...

will nobles be returning????? i have to know. :D also is there a plausible explanation why he was gone? that last one is optional. :P

Steven L. Kent said...

By popular demand, Nobles and Ritz will both be in this book.

I would like to see Harmer, Spuler, and Mars make an appearance, but they are in other parts of the galaxy.

naens said...

gotta work ye olde nogin around that problem.... will the two emes get to unify at some point?

Steven L. Kent said...

I don't want them to integrate. I think the outer territories would provide a purer form of science fiction, one involving societal evolution.

naens said...

do i sense side stories and a new book series of a lawless frontier? where earth is legend?

Steven L. Kent said...

My first pick would be to do a Seven Samurai type story about the Japanese on and the SEAL Clones on New Copenhagen.

Hunter said...

After Harris and Freeman Ritz is defiantly my favorite character. :p also Aaron is right The Gaunts Ghosts series is so amazing because the author makes you care about the characters and at any time he can kill one off... i miss try again brag :(...

Steven L. Kent said...

I should hope you like Ritz.

naens said...

i'd like to see how that would go down. xD

naens said...

*sudden thoughts of ritz replacing cutter*

Steven L. Kent said...

Interesting prognostication, but Ritz is still a Marine.

naens said...

damn, forgot about that.

JenMo said...

You know how I love the ABC SEALs... Any story about how they're doing and I'm in.

naens said...

well we know that their depressed...

Steven L. Kent said...

I would like to see the ABCs as well.

naens said...

the ABCs are some of the most entertaining characters. ^_^

Steven L. Kent said...

The most fun to write are the irreverent ones. Give me a Hunter Ritz or a Mark Phillips. There's an Army general in Assassins named MacAvoy that was too, too much fun to write about.

Aaron Spuler said...

'Try Again' Bragg and Corbec are great ones that I miss from the Ghosts.

James Flynn said...

I lost track and was unable to keep up with the Harris books for a few years, but I'm about caught up. How long do you see yourself writing about this character and his misadventures? Do you see yourself creating any one off stories about other characters in the Harris university, like Ray, or even civilian yet to be made characters and how they interact with the happenings of the Harris world?

Steven L. Kent said...

John Scalzi has done that quite effectively with his Old Man's War series. Book 9, which comes out next October, has sections that are told from Freeman's point of view as well as Travis Watson's. I have toyed with the idea of writing a graphic novels about the Freeman's life as well.

James Flynn said...

Are there any other books besides your clone series and Old Man's War that delve into your Harris Universe?

Steven L. Kent said...

The Old Man's War series doesn't doesn't delve into my universe, it simply shows Scalzi's from many perspectives. It's a great series, maybe the most successful science fiction series in recent years. His books look into his universe from several perspectives.

James, you should give them a read. They are wonderful.

I hear talk of Star Wars books recounting battles and histories from different perspectives. Also, Orson Scott Card has done that very successfully with his Ender-verse. If there has been a science fiction story that has made the jump to historic in recent years, it's Scott Card's Ender's Game.