Thursday, March 06, 2014

WATCH OUT, SHE SAYS SHE CAN TAKE HIM


NEWS FLASH (Taken from USAToday):



Ronda Rousey says she could hang with Floyd Mayweather in an MMA bout




To be precise, Ms. Rousey says:

“I would drop down to the ground and crawl over to him as fast as I can,” Rousey said. “I wouldn’t even stand up, I wouldn’t be near him. I would just do a little army crawl over there… I would just be skittering after him like the one dude in Bloodsport that was doing the whole monkey crawl fight system. I would do that. I would just bear crawl over there, too low for him to hit me, and tackle him down.”


And Floyd Mayweather isn't the only male champion receiving catcalls from across the gender gap. 

Inspired by Rhonday Rousey, NASCAR and Indy pioneeress Danica Patrick has issued a public statement daring Lance Armstrong to man-up, drug-up and pit his pedaling skills against her Indy car.

Also, Women's Speed Skating champion Lee Sang-hwa has put Usain Bolt on notice, declaring that any time he wants to step on the ice, she'll show him what 500 meter-speed is about.

Perhaps the most daunting challenge came from Russian weightlifter Tatiana Kahirina, who has accused U.S. figure skater Ross Miner of ducking her challenge to a power lifting showdown.

Whenever I hear about these shark-dares-bear-to-step-in-the-water challenges, I always think it says more about the challenger than the challenged.  Rhonda Rousey is a phenomenal fighter and may well be the best female fighter in the world; but she makes herself look part insecure/part megalomaniac when she brags about being able to out-kick and grapple a boxer.  Now if she really wants to dazzle, she should fight Mayweather in a boxing ring under WBA rules.

That would be impressive.













18 comments:

Aaron Spuler said...

I agree 100% with everything you've just said Steven!

JenMo said...

I like Rousey, she's pretty funny from what I've seen of her. I wonder if this was her calling out Floyd or if a reporter asked her a hypothetical, "do you think you could take him, and how?" Type of thing.

I think it's tough for female athletes, because no matter how good you are, the asterisk is always the same, "but she could never hold a flame to the top men."

Steven L. Kent said...

You know, JenMo, it really could be just that--her answering a question. I remember a few years ago, when the UCONN women's team started its huge undefeated streak and the UCONN men's team was going through a tough spell. People started speculating about whether of not the women's team might be able to beat the men's team. The coach of women's team put an end to the speculation.

There are exceptions. When Danica Patrick wins a race, she is simply the best, not the best among women.

JenMo said...

Though Danica winning seems unlikely. She's opened the door for female racers and I think it will be another woman who goes through the door and wins.

Steven L. Kent said...

Fair enough. You know what might be interesting is if Rousey did a Billy Jean King, if she found some retired big-mouthed, chauvinist, show man, ala Bobby Riggs and they had it out. Billy Jean King made quite a statement with her win back in

JenMo said...

I would definitely watch that.

Mike said...

I have a 10 yr old daughter in gymnastics and she can definitely beat me in doing back handsprings. I think the gender gap is an artificial construct, yes it's there but our interpretation of it is what is where we place or misplace the importance of it. For example, in a championship game the losers don't cite the 'disability gap' for their cause of losing the game. There is an 'age gap' too that prevents older athletes from maintaining the same physical capacities they once had. I know the OP was NOT in reference too, overtly, a gender gap nor was it meant as commentary on it but the theme is there. The funny thing about 'sport' and competition... there is always someone better and where they come from may just surprise you.

Steven L. Kent said...

Well, I'll be the first to admit, Rhonda Rousey on my less-than petite okole.

Steven L. Kent said...

Sorry, JenMo. I never finished that post about Billy Jean King and Bobby Riggs. When I ran a search to see the year, I saw an ESPN story claiming that Riggs might have thrown the match to clear up a Mob debt.

Is it just me, or does Bobby Riggs look an awful lot like Austin Powers?

JenMo said...

Mike I think you're right about the artificial nature of the gender gap in sports. I don't think Rousey, Serena Williams, or any other woman who's at the top of her game, needs to be compared to men to be legit. It's just one of those topics that fuel the talking heads on ESPN.

naens said...

Well this is certainly interesting.

Mike said...

What about Rousey vs a tiny Mike Ditka? (That's one of my favorite SNL skits)

Steven L. Kent said...

Tiny Mike Ditka is after my time; I'm not familiar with it. Hell Aykroyd and Murray were still on during y time--though I was still around when Eddie Murphy brought Buckwheat to life.

(For the record, I think Eddie Murphy was the best SNL comedian of all. Any challengers?)

JenMo said...

I'm an infrequent SNL viewer, but Andy Samberh to me is the best of the current generation.

Steven L. Kent said...

With SNL and Mad Magazine, everyone always thinks of their generation as being the golden age, when we all know that the late seventies and early eighties were really the golden age of both institutions.

Steven L. Kent said...

Maybe I'm wrong, but to me, this flies in the face of true feminism. True feminism, as I understand it, defiantly states, "We are every bit as able as you."

I see much of the rise of female athletics as a new "Jim Crow cottage industry," a separate-but-equal that is anything but equal.

When Danica Patrick races, she doesn't ask for a faster car, a small head start, or a shorter track; she races on the same track in the same basic car as everyone else. Chauvinist drivers may try to shut her out--probably do, but she asks for no helping hand.

In non-sports arenas, women have proven that they can dominate. According to the authors of Super Freakonomics, female emergency room physicians have a superior success rate than their male counterparts.

Authors such as J.K. Rowling, Suzanne Collins, Charlene Harris, Nora Roberts, and Stephanie Meyer practically own the bestsellers lists. I know; I'm so far behind the pack that I don't even inhale their dust.

I'd bet heavily that Ginny Rometty (IBM), Indra Nooyi (PepsiCo), and Marissa Mayer (Yahoo) don't ask for handouts while climbing corporate ladders. (And... yes, I admit I looked their names up on CNN Money.)

So, when an amazingly talented fighter like Rhonda Rousey says, "I think I can beat Mayweather" as long as..., I think it reinforces the antiquated notions about women competing on an open field.

JenMo said...

Is it really though? Rhonda isn't a pugilist. Her bread and butter is ground attacks. Saying she'd use what she's best at is only admitting to knowledge of her own ability. It's an apples and oranges comparison. If she said she could match her ground attack to a male who specialized in the same, that's be a more compelling argument, for me anyway.

Steven L. Kent said...

JenMo, I think we are disagreeing while saying the same thing. I happen to agree with your point that her comments were never shown in context and that she may well have been responding to a question. We agree that she has a place in fighting history as well. In fact, I'm really not sure where we disagree.